This article is part of a series about why it’s important to hire an attorney and the reasons behind hiring an attorney.  The purpose of this series is to help you determine the types of situations where a lawyer is most needed and to know when to reach out for assistance in advance.  Stay tuned as we explore this topic more in the coming series!

Do I really Need An Attorney?

Often I speak with a new client that comes for help after a situation has taken place and it’s too late for me to help.  After they have talked to the police when they were not obligated to do so; after they have agreed to give up half of their home when the law did not require that it be split; after they’ve attended a hearing and had a negative result.  It’s troublesome that the person didn’t seek out help earlier, when I could have helped, and instead, there is nothing now that I can to do assist.

Speak to an attorney NOW.

The questions I often hear sound like this:

  • Do I need an attorney for such a simple matter?  I can handle this myself, I think.
  • Do I need an aggressive attorney for my divorce?  We don’t want to fight and don’t have much to argue about.
  • Do I really need an attorney for this? I think my husband and I can just sit down and talk this through or attend mediation.
  • Do I need an attorney for my OUI? Won’t I get the same sentence regardless?
  • Do I need an attorney for my will? It should be simple.  Isn’t it something I can do with a software program?

Isn’t that the Court’s job?

Here’s the deal:  The Court will never require that an attorney represent you in a particular case (absent circumstances of competency, age, physical/mental illness, etc.).  Each of the above scenarios above can be answered in detail differently, but the simple answer is typically the same.  Yes, you do need an attorney.  Then comes the next question: What type of attorney should I hire or does it matter?

Aren’t all Lawyers the Same? Sharks of a Different Color?

Clients often think the only type of attorney is a rude, aggressive attorney.  They want a “shark” to represent them.   That’s not always necessary.  It depends on the case and the situation at hand whether it is time to negotiate or litigate.  It may take a combination of both to meet your goals.  It is also important to have realistic expectations for the outcome of your case.  An experienced attorney knows how to navigate through your case and when to apply each of these practices to get you the best result that meets your goals for the future.

Stay tuned for Part II of this Series when I will discuss:  What types of issues can be avoided by having an experienced attorney?

Are you facing a legal matter and not sure what comes next? Contact me for a consultation.  We will sit down, discuss your concerns, and see if there are any options for you legally.